Washington, D.C.: Three Centuries of American Prints from the National Gallery of Art

A-Midnight-Race-Slideshow
Estándar

Image: Frances Flora Palmer, A Midnight Race on the Mississippi (detail), 1860, color lithograph with hand-coloring on wove paper, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Donald and Nancy de Laski Fund, 2012

 

April 3 – July 24,

2016West Building, Ground Floor, Outer Tier Galleries

Overview: This exhibition surveys how America and its people have been represented in prints made by American and non-American artists between 1710 and 2010. Early prints of the continent’s indigenous peoples, its landscapes, flora and fauna, its historical events, wars, and citizenry reflect the curiosity of Europeans about a world they perceived as new and strange. At the same time, American artists often turned to prints to present a vision of their youthful democracy.

Prints are well-suited for quickly conveying images of contemporary events to a wide audience, and thus have often been a forum for social commentary or criticism. The exhibition includes works from across the centuries that aim to raise awareness and inspire change. On view, for instance, is an engraving of the Boston Massacre by Paul Revere as well as a broadside from more than two hundred years later by the undercover feminist collective known as the Guerrilla Girls. The exhibition also features works by artists equally drawn to the aesthetic potential of printmaking. From James McNeill Whistler, Mary Cassatt, and others of the late nineteenth century to Jackson Pollock and Helen Frankenthaler in the twentieth, vanguard artists have explored printmaking’s unique artistic possibilities. In recent years, radical experiments by artists such as Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, and Richard Serra have pushed to the breaking point the very definition of the medium.

King-of-the-Maquas-Slideshow

John Simon after John Verelst, Sa Ga Yeath Qua Pieth Tow, King of the Maquas, after 1710, mezzotint, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Paul Mellon Fund, 2001

The more than 150 prints in this exhibition, mounted on the occasion of the National Gallery’s 75th anniversary, are drawn entirely from the Gallery’s collection, including promised gifts.

Organization: Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington

Sponsors: The exhibition is made possible by Altria Group in celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the National Gallery of Art.

The international tour of the exhibition is sponsored by the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Additional support is provided by The Exhibition Circle of the National Gallery of Art.

Passes: Admission is always free and passes are not required

Other Venues: National Gallery, Prague, October 4, 2016–January 5, 2017
Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso, Mexico City, February 7–April 30, 2017

White-Pelican-Slideshow

Robert Havell Jr. after John James Audubon, American White Pelican, 1836, from The Birds of America, hand-colored etching and aquatint, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mrs. Walter B. James, 1945

Queer-Fish

Mabel Dwight, Queer Fish, 1936, lithograph, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Reba and Dave Williams Collection, Gift of Reba and Dave Williams, 2008

Shrine-Quartet-Slideshow

Grant Wood, Shrine Quartet, 1939, lithograph, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Reba and Dave Williams Collection, Florian Carr Fund and Gift of the Print Research Foundation, 2008

Sweet-Dreams

Roy Lichtenstein, Sweet Dreams, Baby!, 1965, screenprint, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Roy and Dorothy Lichtenstein, 1996. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Mariyn

Andy Warhol, Marilyn, 1967, screenprint, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Reba and Dave Williams Collection, Florian Carr Fund and Gift of the Print Research Foundation, 2008

Flags-I

Jasper Johns, Flags I, 1973, screenprint, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection, 1994. Published by Jasper Johns and Simca Print Artists, Inc. © Jasper Johns and Simca Print Artists, Inc./Licensed by VAGA, New York, N

INFO: http://www.nga.gov/

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